4 things to remove from your resume

4 Things to Cut From Your Resume

The first thing to do when considering a job is to make a note of all the keywords in the job description. Look at the way the words are ordered – all the most important skills and work experience will be listed in the order of importance. Then take a look at your resume, highlighting relevant experiences that matches what is in the job description. If it turns out there aren’t too many matches, then you should consider that the job isn’t the one for you. On the other hand, if you do find lots of matches, then you should pursue and effectively tailor your work experience and show the employer you’re the employee they’ve been dreaming of finding.

Here are four things to cut from your resume, along with why.

Cut Out Unnecessary Information Unrelated to the Job Description

If you have information that was relevant for your last job application, but not this one, then you should cut it. This isn’t to say that every achievement doesn’t matter. It’s more so that some achievements make you more appealing than others for certain positions. Take the unnecessary information out, and make strategic use of the additional space. Removing irrelevant information shows that you are able to go into more detail when it matters. Make the information that matters your top priority, and remove anything that doesn’t matter.

Cut Out The Objective

The objective is the bit before your experience and skills, and it commonly goes something like this; “Looking to work as part of a team and add to the value of the company”. Not only is this predictable, but it also works against you by handicapping you and preventing you from being able to clearly describe just what it is that you’re offering.

Cut out the objective and replace it with a section titled “About Me”. Keep in mind that you want to find a good fit when looking for a job. You aren’t looking to pitch yourself to companies that wouldn’t appreciate what you have to offer. Having to pretend you like your job and employer is one of the most damaging things you can do. Everyone is out to find gainful employment with an employer that they can resonate with.

Cut out Irrelevant Work History

If you don’t have a lot of previous job experience, then you might find yourself putting down your entire work history. Every job you list should include the use of skills that will be a benefit to the position you’re applying for. Take out the irrelevant job information, and choose a more direct approach instead.

This means not taking the typical reverse-chronological approach to listing your past work experience. Angle the description of each job listing towards skills and expertise that are related to the job and company you are applying for. The content of your resume should be tailored to match the job you’re applying for by showing off how you gained quick cash handling skills from working at a coffee shop and how it demonstrated how much management trusted you. Ask yourself the queastion: why – and if – the recruiter will care about the jobs you list in your history.

Cut Out Redundancy

If you set up appointments with five of your previous jobs, then there’s no need to go in to detail on all of them. Ensure that the experience highlights either the most note worthy aspects of the responsibilities of that position, or what you were best at. Also ensure you make it clear how this experience can be translated to the job you’re applying for.

Cut out redundancy and focus on the quality. Consider quality over quantity and think about how silly it would be for a recruiter to toss out a resume just because it was two pages when it’s the best two-page resume for the best client for the job. They’ll get excited when you give them two-page resume that is well-crafted and deeply considered evidence you’re the best fit for their job. If you think that the quality is right but the quantity isn’t, then you can check again and see if anything can be cut.

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